Conclusions from Studies on Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

There have been numerous medical studies of cubital tunnel syndrome patients, treatments and surgeries.  This article lists some general conclusions from these studies and from patient experiences posted on the Web.  This provides an overview only and has not been certified by a medical organization.  You are encouraged to read the studies for the official and complete results, conclusions and details.

Note: In spite of trends found in these studies, each case of cubital tunnel syndrome is unique. Do not rely solely on this website, any other website, or your family doctor. Please see a hand doctor or surgeon, and get a second opinion if you have any doubts.

Following are some unofficial conclusions from cubital tunnel syndrome studies and patient experiences:

  • There are many causes of cubital tunnel syndrome: injury, cysts, sleeping on bent elbow, sports, computer use, and other repetitive motion activities.
  • MCV tests that indicate “decreased velocity” across the ulnar nerve are useful to diagnose cubital tunnel syndrome.
  • If you cannot solve your cubital tunnel syndrome with conservative treatment, you should seek surgery.
  • But don’t wait too long to seek surgery.  The worse your condition before surgery, the less chance for a complete recovery.
  • The success rate is roughly the same for the three major types of cubital tunnel surgery — decompression, transposition, and medial epicondylectomy.  About 70% of patients see improvement, 20% see little or no improvement, and 10% may get worse.
  • Ulnar nerve decompression is the preferred method of surgery for patients with mild to moderate symptoms.  It is typically not effective for subsequent surgeries on the same arm.
  • Anterior subcutaneous transposition is the preferred method of surgery for patients with severe symptoms or for subsequent surgeries on the same arm.
  • Recovery time depends on the surgical method.  Decompression patients can begin light use of their arm in 1-2 weeks, heavy use in 2-4 weeks.  Transposition patients must immobilize their arm for 2-4 weeks, then perform physical therapy for another 1-3 months.
  • Most patients recover fully within six months, but complete recovery may take years.
  • Cubital tunnel symptoms and pain may return over time, especially if the patient resumes the activities that caused the problem in the first place.

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Related posts:

  1. Studies on Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
  2. Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
  3. Study Questions Transposition Surgery for Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
  4. Recovery Time from Cubital Tunnel Surgery
  5. Top 10 Things You Need to Know About Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Important: This website is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information on this website represents the personal experience of cubital tunnel patients and has not been certified by medical professionals. Each person and case is different. Be sure to seek medical advice from a doctor with experience treating cubital tunnel syndrome and get a second opinion if needed.

One Response to “Conclusions from Studies on Cubital Tunnel Syndrome”

  1. [...] Studies show the success rate is roughly the same for the three major types of cubital tunnel surgery.  About 70% of patients see significant improvement, 20% see some improvement, and 10% may see no change or even get worse.  From anecdotal evidence in the CuTS forums, surgery seems to help most patients at least a little bit. [...]